Fresh Seaweed Spread

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VERSION FRANCAISE: CLIQUEZ ICI                   READ THE INTERVIEW HERE

CLICK HERE TO VISIT SOPHIE’S WEBSITE & GET INFO ON HER NEXT COOKING CLASSES

This is a raw-food recipe shared by Sophie Volatier (check out the interview here).  We enjoyed the spread on slices of cucumber, carrot, tomato and orange! It is truly delicious and about as healthy as you can get.

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Ingredients:

Dulse seaweed, fresh (8 oz)

Sea lettuce, fresh (8 oz)

3 shallots, medium-sized

3 – 4 Limes, Juice & Pulp (or 1-2 lemons)

2 Garlic cloves

9 French cornichons or mini-gherkins

Sunflower seeds, pre-soaked or sprouted, a handful

1 bunch Parsely

6-10 TB Olive Oil (depending on desired texture)

IMG_6144-cr-web   Steps:

  • Wash the seaweed (see directions below*)
  • Coarsely chop the garlic, shallots and gherkins
  • Juice the limes
  • In a food processor:
    • Add the (washed) parsely with part of the stems if not too thick; mix
    • Add the shallots, gherkins, lime juice (and sunflower seeds if desired); mix
    • Crush the garlic and add it to the mixture
    • Add the seaweed
    • Add the olive oil (if desired)
    • Mix until you achieve the desired consistency (the longer you mix, the more spreadable and dense your mixture will be)

IMG_6134-web     IMG_6142-web     IMG_6206-web     IMG_6168-cr-web     IMG_6239-web     IMG_6269-web Notes: This is an extremely versatile recipe. If you don’t like raw garlic can leave it out. If you don’t like shallots, leave them out, etc. If you’re into sprouts, add more sprouts. You can adjust everything to your liking. This is a raw and low-fat recipe. The sunflower seeds add a nice crunch but do also add more fat. The mixture stays fresh for at least 5 days in an airtight jar in the fridge; the seaweed packed in salt stays fresh for weeks, and most likely months in the fridge.   IMG_625-web     * Washing the seaweed:

  • Put one type of seaweed at a time into a light-colored bassin (easier to detect sand, rocks or shrimp)
  • Run a thin stream of water from the faucet (you can collect the water later and use it to water your plants or your garden)
  • Wash one “leaf” of seaweed at a time, carefully rinsing away grains of sand, or tiny animals that tend to hide in folds
  • Remove the hard spot from seaweed like Dulse (this is the part that used to be attached to the rock and may still contain remnants)
  • Squeeze the excess water from each leaf then put it aside in a bowl.
  • Once all of the seaweed is washed, form it into a ball between your hands and squeeze hard to get the remaining water out.

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CLICK HERE TO VISIT SOPHIE’S WEBSITE & GET INFO ON HER NEXT COOKING CLASSES

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